Bible in the Church of Ireland and AGM 2012 summary

BACI’s first event, held at the Church of Ireland Theological Institute, was held on 21 April 2012. The event was attended by approximately 40 people from around Ireland.

Professor David Ford gave a talk on the Gospel of John and how it models its own interpretation. A lively discussion followed.

Professor Gordon McConville gave a talk on the Old Testament modelling re-interpretation, focusing on Kings and Isaiah.

Stephen Lyons described 9 features of an Anglican approach to the Bible which he found to be reflected in documents and statements, and related it to the Bible in the Life of the Church Project.

After lunch, a panel consisting of ++Michael Jackson, +Michael Burrows, and Prof. David Ford discussed the topics from the morning in the context of the Church of Ireland. The attendees were quite involved in discussing how things were and could be. There was widespread concern over the level of engagement generally.

The day closed with BACI’s inaugural AGM. Revd Dr William Olhausen presented the vision for BACI, and opened it up for suggestions. Revd Dr Virginia Kennerley described its projects to date. Dr Jason Silverman gave a preliminary report on the Economic Justice course.

Some officers were elected to BACI’s first formal committee, with the remit to expand their numbers to appropriate size.

Chair: Rev Dr William Olhausen
Secretary: Dr Jason Silverman
Treasurer: Ms Judith Wilkinson
Press Officer: Revd Dr Virginia Kennerley
A vice-chair and six members-at-large remain outstanding.

A constitution was adopted, with minor emendations of the draft constitution.

The new committee was authorised to open a bank account.

In the future, BACI will rework the Economic Justice study for wider Anglican use. It is also planned to hold future symposia in Belfast and in Cork.

Holy Week: Time to prepare for Easter, fill out Feedback Forms, and plan to visit Dublin.

Easter is just a week away. The Lent study has five weeks, so presumably most groups which used it have completed the study by now. We sincerely hope you find it helpful and encouraging, and we’ve received some enthusiastic responses on the Economic Justice study.  We strongly encourage all rectors, parishioners, and individuals who have used the study to fill in the short feedback form at the back of the study (also available here), and send it to us. BACI will collate and analyze the responses, which will be reported at the first BACI symposium, to the Church of Ireland, and to the ACO’s Bible in the Life of the Church project.

As has been announced in the CoI Gazette, BACI encourages people from throughout Ireland to attend our first symposium on the Bible in the Church of Ireland on 21 April 2012 at the Church of Ireland Theological Institute, Braemor Park, Dublin 14. The event will encourage the discussion and consideration of the way the Bible is, ought, and could be read in the Church today. Cost is only  €35 and includes tea and coffee and lunch. CoI ordinands may come for free, and students may come for only  €15. We do encourage advanced booking, so we may let CITI know lunch numbers.

The day will include the speakers Professor David Ford (Cambridge University), Professor Gordon McConville (Gloucestershire University), Stephen Lyon (Anglican Communion Office), the Most Reverend Dr Michael Jackson, and the Right Reverend Michael Burrows.  Ample time throughout the day will be devoted to discussion.

The day will end with the election of an executive committee for BACI. All interested in running are welcome to put their names forward for nominations. We hope to have the committee to be representative of the CoI, geographically, theologically, and vocationally (lay and clerical). The positions envisioned at present are those of Chair, Vice-Chair, Secretary, Treasurer, Press Officer, and four members-at-large.

Please spread the word and encourage all you know to come. A basic flier can be found here, and a more detailed flier here. A poster in three designs for the symposium is also available in colour, black and white, and on a white background.